Tracking terrorists online might invade your privacy

Remember that picture you sent to your family of your children playing in the paddling pool? Or that private text you sent to someone trusted? Or when you searched for medical advice? 

Then, guess what: those messages and websites you visited will be stored and could potentially be obtained by criminals. What’s more, as soon as these messages are sent, their metadata (who we speak to, where we were, when it took place and how long we spent talking) and the content of communications could potentially be read by government agencies with a warrant.

When it comes to the services you're connected to the internet, the Investigatory Powers Act (known derisively to some as the Snooper’s Charter) allows government agencies, under certain circumstances, to access those records. What's more, a technical capability regulation was leaked in May to the Open Rights Group, a civil rights group. Such a notice would legally compel a telecommunications firm to record all of the communications by the target(s) named in the warrant, and to transmit this information, in near real-time, in a readable format (if it's already in a readable format).

Following the recent terror attacks in London and Manchester, Prime Minister Theresa May reiterated her intention to “regulate cyberspace to prevent the spread of extremist and terrorism planning.”

This is to help protect us from future acts of terrorism – and disclosing intercepted content in real time isn't new – but is it an intrusion into our private lives?

Comments

Privacy Policy

Tracking terrorists online might invade your privacy is dedicated to protecting consumer privacy on the Internet. Our practices are consistent with privacy guidelines established by eTrust.com.

Tracking terrorists online might invade your privacy does not require any personal information to obtain access to our website.

Tracking terrorists online might invade your privacy does require limited personal information including name and mailing address from individuals wishing to join as members. Additional information such as e-mail address and phone number may also be requested in order that we may contact members in a timely manner on issues related to our mission.

You will only receive e-mail from us if you request to be added to our e-mail list. You may revise or remove your e-mail address from our files at any time.

Tracking terrorists online might invade your privacy uses "cookie" technology to obtain non-personal information from our online visitors, such as browser/computer type, number of visitors, and site usage. We do not use cookies to extract personal information.

Our website contains links to other sites, but Tracking terrorists online might invade your privacy does not necessarily advocate, support or condone the privacy practices or content of these websites.

Tracking terrorists online might invade your privacy makes all information received from our online visitors as secure as possible against unauthorized access and use. All information is protected by state-of-the-art security technology.

Tracking terrorists online might invade your privacy respects the individual privacy rights and concerns of visitors to our website. We support meaningful self-regulation of the Internet to ensure that responsible organizations maintain the right to use all communications media to interact with the public.