This Is How Bipartisan Health Care Reform Could Actually Happen

One of the most consequential health care bills in decades was to be voted on in the House. It would affect nearly every American. It was supported by Paul Ryan and the relevant Committee chairs and opposed by House Freedom Caucus partisans — Reps. Mark Meadows, Jim Jordan, Justin Amash and Dave Brat, cheered on by Senate hardliners.

But in this instance, the Freedom Caucus opposition would be of little consequence. The bill passed the House by an overwhelming bipartisan vote of 392-37. It sailed through the Senate two weeks later with 92 Senators voting in favor, and was signed into law by the President.

This is not science fiction; the bill, called the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA), passed two years ago. It was cosponsored by Democratic stalwarts, and had been carefully put together by senior staffers working together over the prior year.

In the aftermath of the disastrous American Health Care Act of 2017, is there still room for bipartisan cooperation on healthcare? Despite all the breathless blow-by-blow accounts of arm-twisting and vote-getting, the true lesson of this failure is that policy matters, perhaps even more than politics. The bill was rushed and poorly drafted. It achieved no pressing national purpose other than large tax cuts for the wealthy — at the expense of older, sicker, and low-income Americans.

The prospects of bipartisan cooperation on healthcare seem dim today. But under the right set of circumstances, we might again see an opening for carefully crafted policy that addresses the real and serious healthcare challenges facing Americans.

Comments

Privacy Policy

This Is How Bipartisan Health Care Reform Could Actually Happen is dedicated to protecting consumer privacy on the Internet. Our practices are consistent with privacy guidelines established by eTrust.com.

This Is How Bipartisan Health Care Reform Could Actually Happen does not require any personal information to obtain access to our website.

This Is How Bipartisan Health Care Reform Could Actually Happen does require limited personal information including name and mailing address from individuals wishing to join as members. Additional information such as e-mail address and phone number may also be requested in order that we may contact members in a timely manner on issues related to our mission.

You will only receive e-mail from us if you request to be added to our e-mail list. You may revise or remove your e-mail address from our files at any time.

This Is How Bipartisan Health Care Reform Could Actually Happen uses "cookie" technology to obtain non-personal information from our online visitors, such as browser/computer type, number of visitors, and site usage. We do not use cookies to extract personal information.

Our website contains links to other sites, but This Is How Bipartisan Health Care Reform Could Actually Happen does not necessarily advocate, support or condone the privacy practices or content of these websites.

This Is How Bipartisan Health Care Reform Could Actually Happen makes all information received from our online visitors as secure as possible against unauthorized access and use. All information is protected by state-of-the-art security technology.

This Is How Bipartisan Health Care Reform Could Actually Happen respects the individual privacy rights and concerns of visitors to our website. We support meaningful self-regulation of the Internet to ensure that responsible organizations maintain the right to use all communications media to interact with the public.